12 Jun 2019

Congratulations to staff awarded Queen's Birthday Honours!


Central Clinical School had a number of staff awarded Queen's Birthday Honours over the long weekend. We're exceedingly proud of them and the service they've provided to the School and the community through their research, clinical practice and teaching.

Clot-busting drug may affect stroke patients’ immune system: study

by Anne Crawford

A study by Monash University’s Australian Centre for Blood Diseases (ACBD) into a drug commonly used to remove blot clots in stroke suggests it may weaken the immune system.

The study, published in Frontiers in Immunology, found that t-PA (tissue-type
plasminogen activator) affected several aspects related to the immune system in a mouse model of acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Ischemic stroke is caused when a blood vessel supplying blood to the brain is obstructed by a clot, and accounts for 80 per cent of all types of stroke. It is a leading cause of disability and mortality worldwide.

3MT Comp Winners!

CCS Competition winner Lakshanie Wickramasinghe

The School's annual Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition took place here on May 27, pitting seven brave young researchers against each other in a bid to explain their research in plain English, and in only three minutes. The competition is a wonderful opportunity to practice sharing complex but vital research with a lay audience.

Congratulations are due to all contestants for stepping up to the mark, but in particular the following winners:  

Second place Akshita Rana in action

First place: Lakshanie Wickramasinghe (Immunology) -  Lungs, Eyes and Wonder, baby.

Second place: Akshita Rana (ACBD) - Stroke, heart attack and a 'smart' little antibody: A tale unfolds

People's Choice: Hattapark (Jeff) Dejakaisay (Neuroscience) - Potential Role of Glutamate in the pathogenesis of Acquired Epilepsy in Alzheimer's Disease.

CCS Recent Publications: 27th May - 10th June 2019

Recent publications for Central Clinical School feature affiliated authors in the following departments:


  • MAPrc
  • ACBD
  • Anaesthesia & Perioperative Medicine
  • Neuroscience
  • Diabetes
  • Melbourne Sexual Health Centre
  • Immunology & Pathology
  • Gastroenterology
  • Surgery

5 Jun 2019

Translational Research Symposium Speaker Spotlight: Professor Gail Risbridger


Professor Gail Risbridger
Monash University's 5th annual Translational Research Symposium is being hosted by its three metropolitan clinical schools on 21 June 2019. The symposium will host a diverse group of medical researchers presenting their work into translational research. RSVP here.

The Plenary speaker for the event is Professor Gail Risbridger, Deputy Dean, Special Projects, Monash Partners Comprehensive Cancer Consortium and Research Director, Prostate Cancer Research Program.

29 May 2019

Spotlight on MS Research


Dr Steven Petratos and Dr Erica Kim
Thursday 30th May is World MS Day.  A global initiative to raise awareness for those affected by Multiple Sclerosis. This year's theme is My Invisible MS, an opportunity to make visible the symptoms of MS and educate the broader community. 

When Dr Erica Kim began her honours degree in the Neuroscience Department at Central Clinical School, she arrived with simply a passion for neuroscience. Now, with a PhD completed, along with two first author primary research papers, 2 author reviews and contributing author credits, it seems that this researcher is in it for the long haul with a firm focus on developing cell and gene-based therapies to treat intractable neurodegenerative disease, particularly Multiple Sclerosis.

Investigative research is a slow burn, particularly at a molecular level. It can take years to see a project translate from the investigative to pre-clinical stages and then there is no guarantee of progression to a clinical trial. Erica is keen to witness her earlier research progress into clinical trials. The molecules that have been the focus of her work, which may contribute or initiate such damage in MS are becoming known and by targeting them, it may be possible to limit the destruction, which occurs to nerve fibres in the brain and spinal cord, promoting a better clinical outcome for individuals living with MS.

Public Health researcher wins Prestigious Alumni Award


A/Prof. Chow receives his award from Professor Rodney Phillips,
Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, UNSW
Associate Professor Eric Chow has won the 2019 UNSW Young Alumni Award. The Young Alumni Award acknowledges the most accomplished UNSW Sydney Alumni under 35 years across 13

categories spanning science and technology to arts and services to the community.

Eric made a career change in 2012 by completing a Master of Public Health followed by a PhD at UNSW Sydney, where he received the Faculty of Medicine Dean’s List. The MPH provided Eric with new knowledge in public health, epidemiology, biostatistics, health promotion and mathematical modelling. His PhD thesis, which focused on HIV epidemiology and sexual practice among at-risk populations in China, has paved the way for his impressive research in the field of sexual health.

First CCS journal club a great success

The Central Clinical School (CCS) Student Journal Club series kicked off to a great start on Tuesday May 21st, with a large crowd attending. The theme was hepatology, and two honours students, Jacqueline Bredhauer and Terence Fong, presented engaging talks on Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease papers. They were mentored by Dr Natasha Janko, gastroenterologist, who also chaired the session.

CCS Recent Publications: 20th May - 26th May 2019


A/Prof. Eric Chow
Recent publications for Central Clinical School feature affiliated authors in the following departments:
  • Surgery
  • Melbourne Sexual Health Centre
  • MAPrc
  • Neuroscience
  • Immunology and Pathology
  • AIRMed




Translational Research Sumposium Speaker Spotlight: Dr Vilija Jokubaitis

Dr Vilija Jokubaitis
Monash University's 5th annual Translational Research Symposium is being hosted by its three 21 June 2019. The symposium will host a diverse group of medical researchers presenting their work into translational research. RSVP here.
metropolitan clinical schools on

Dr Vilija Jokubaitis is Head of the Neuroimmunology Genomics and Prognostics Group, MS and Neuroimmunology in the Department of Neuroscience.

22 May 2019

Upset ‘body clocks’ may be driving heart disease epidemic

by Anne Crawford

A Monash University researcher is warning that circadian rhythm disturbance –  disruptions to our ‘body clock’ – may be a common factor behind the global diabetes, obesity and heart disease epidemics.
Professor Paul Zimmet AO

Professor Paul Zimmet AO said studies suggest circadian disturbance may be a feature of the cluster of heart disease risk factors including obesity, elevated blood pressure, high blood sugar levels (prediabetes and diabetes) and blood cholesterol collectively called the Metabolic Syndrome.

“There’s a clear clinical situation in about 30 to 40 percent of adult Australians where a number of important cardiovascular disease risk factors come together,” Professor Zimmet said. “And people who have these risk factors are more likely to get co-morbidities such as sleep apnoea, depression, fatty liver disease and cognitive disability,” he said.

“No-one’s proposed that all of the things we’re talking about – both the cardiometabolic ones plus the co-morbidities – are linked together by disturbed circadian rhythm. We’re proposing that ‘Metabolic Syndrome’ be renamed ‘Circadian Syndrome’.”


Rare neurological case raises alerts for clinicians


When a man in his late fifties was referred to neurologist Professor Owen White in August 2016 with double vision, facial weakness and an unsteady gait, it appeared he had suffered something akin to a stroke. The reality was even more sinister. A concerted effort by medical teams to pinpoint the mysterious condition as the man’s health progressively failed eventually led to the diagnosis of an exceptionally rare disease – and some lessons for those involved and clinicians beyond. A paper documenting this unusual case appeared recently in the Journal of Clinical Neuroscience.

by Anne Crawford

The patient had originally been diagnosed in hospital with neurological symptoms including double vision, difficulty balancing and stuttering. An MRI scan showed an abnormality in the pons, part of the back of the brain.

However, the man didn’t follow the normal history of stroke. Multiple investigations failed to find an answer to fluctuating, persistent and evolving symptoms.

“Clinically he looked like patients with myasthenia gravis, an immune condition where an antibody is created which blocks conduction from the nerve to muscle. He had changed cranial nerve signs which is always unusual except in myasthenia gravis,” Professor White said.


Broccoli! The bitter brassica delivering a sweet health reward

by Anne Crawford

Broccoli, love it or hate it, is well-known as a food that has a host of vitamins, minerals and fibre beneficial to our health in general. Evidence is mounting too that it may have properties to help fight cancer, boost immunity, counter inflammation and even help children with autism.

A team led by Dr Tom Karagiannis from Monash University’s Department of Diabetes has published a review of clinical trials worldwide testing the benefits of the active ingredient sulforaphane. Sulforaphane is produced in the body from a naturally occurring compound called glucoraphanin, found in cruciferous vegetables including cauliflower, cabbage, bok choy and broccoli. The highest concentration is found in broccoli sprouts.

“We looked at more than 100 clinical trials done into sulforaphane and how effective it was in different types of disease,” Dr Karagiannis said. “In the last couple of years, research has increased exponentially on this compound,” he said.

The review, published in Clinical Nutrition last month, is part of a body of work by Dr Karagiannis with the ultimate aim of developing a pharmaceutical-grade sulforaphane preparation for clinical use in inflammatory conditions.


CCS Recent Publications: 3rd May - 19th May

Prof. Paul Zimmet's article calling for recognition
of a new syndrome has been published this month.
Recent publications for Central Clinical School feature affiliated authors in the following departments:

  • Melbourne Sexual Health Centre
  • Neuroscience
  • MAPrc
  • AIRMed
  • NTRI
  • Anaesthesia and Perioperative Medicine
  • Peninsula Clinical School
  • Obesity Research and Education
  • Diabetes
  • Surgery
  • Gastroenterology
  • ACBD



Translational Research Symposium Speaker Spotlight: Associate Professor Kathryn Holt


PLEAA/Prof Kathryn Holt
UPDATE: A/Prof Kat Holt will no longer be speaking at the symposium.  Dr Kelly Wyres will be speaking instead.

Monash University's 5th annual Translational Research Symposium is being hosted by its three metropolitan clinical schools on 21 June 2019. The symposium will host a diverse group of medical researchers presenting their work into translational research. RSVP here.

Associate Professor Kathryn Holt is a group leader in the Department of Infectious Diseases at Central Clinical School and Alfred Health.

15 May 2019

CCS Recent Publications: 30th April - 6th May

Due to staff illness, this week's recent publications will be included in the next edition of the CCS News.

Revealing the mysterious ways the gut affects kidney disease

by Anne Crawford
Dr Matthew Snelson

Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is estimated to affect 13 per cent of the population globally. It is associated with a two- to three-fold increased risk of death caused by the disease itself and also carries a higher risk to patients of dying from heart disease or stroke.

Patients with CKD have increased levels of uremic toxins – toxins produced by bacteria in the gut that are normally excreted in the urine in healthy people but which build up in those with CKD.

A recent PhD graduate of Monash University’s Central Clinical School has conducted a review of literature to understand how this happens as a base to eventually finding ways of preventing it by creating new therapeutics.

Dr Matthew Snelson, a winner of the CCS’s 3MT (three minute thesis) award, became interested in CKD as a clinical dietitian working in Perth. “I was very interested in the role of gut microbiota and the mechanisms by which diet affects disease outcomes,” he said. “The emerging evidence looking at the link between the gut and the kidney was a really interesting area.”


Study reveals new mechanism of gonorrhoea transmission


A/Prof Eric Chow from the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre was in the Washington Post recently following publication of a paper on which he was lead author. The paper, published in Sexually Transmitted Infections, found that kissing with tongue may be a way to transmit oropharyngeal gonorrhoea, or oral gonorrhoea, particularly among gay and bisexual men. The study team featured a number of other Central Clinical School researchers.

CCS Travel Grant Outcome - 2019 Round 1


CCS is pleased to announce the successful recipients of the 2019 Round 1 Travel Grant. Congratulations to all.

For information and guidelines on the scheme, visit https://sites.google.com/a/monash.edu/ccsintranet/research/funding/opportunities

Translational Research Symposium Speaker Spotlight: Professor Mark Shackleton

Professor Mark Shackleton
Monash University's 5th annual Translational Research Symposium is being hosted by its three metropolitan clinical schools on 21 June 2019. The symposium will host a diverse group of medical researchers presenting their work into translational research. RSVP here.

Professor Mark Shackleton is Director of Oncology at Alfred Health and Professor of Oncology in the Department of Medicine, Monash University.

8 May 2019

Focus on Diabetes: Sunway Biomedical Symposium


Prof. Paul Zimmet
attended the recent Sunway Biomedical Symposium.
Professor Mark Cooper and Professor Paul Zimmet recently attended the Sunway Biomedical Symposium in Malaysia.  Leading academics from the University of Cambridge, University of Oxford, Jeffrey Cheah School of Medicine and Health Sciences and Monash University came together for the two-day symposium. With a focus on diabetes mellitus, the theme was "Diabetes: Disarming the Silent Killer".

The major cost of diabetes is its complications. Professor Cooper’s presentation highlighted new approaches to these complications such as SGLT2 Inhibitors and GLP-1 analysis, which appear to offer end-organ protection independent of their glucose lowering effects.



PrEPX Study reveals increase in STIs



A/Prof Edwina Wright, Principal Investigator of the recent PrEPX study
A recent study of men using HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has explored the changes in sexually transmitted infection (STI) incidence following initiation of the preventative treatment.  The data collated from almost 3000 participants in the PrEPX study revealed a 20% increase in STI rates. Interestingly, condom use did not play a part in acquiring an STI when using PrEP, despite being an initial concern for those commencing the treatment. Instead, participants reporting higher numbers of sex partners and participation in group sex were at a greater risk.

Platform Access Grants Success!

Jess Borger, Tiffany Bouchery and Emily Edwards

Congratulations to Emily Edwards, Jess Borger and Tiffany Bouchery who recently received Platform Access Grants  from the Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences.  The scheme is an initiative to encourage research development through engagement with the FMNHS technology research platforms, with a view to strengthen researchers capability and international competitiveness. The seed funding also aims at attracting external national and international competitive grants.


Grant win for Dr Bridgette Semple

Congratulations to Dr Bridgette Semple, who has been awarded the 2019 Capstone Editing Grant for Mid-Career Researchers!
Dr Bridgette Semple (left)

Capstone Editing, an Australian academic editing company, supports one researcher annually to undertake an innovative research project with a view to gathering preliminary data that will lead to the development of a research council funding application.

Dr Semple is the Head of the Paediatric Neurotrauma Group in the Department of Neuroscience.  Her research focuses on traumatic brain injury, particularly during early childhood. The funds from this grant will assist with her collaboration with Associate Professor Margaret Hibbs from the Immunology Department.  They will investigate the role of the SHIP-1 enzyme, which is yet to be explored in the brain.


CCS Recent Publications 10th April - 29th April

Dr Be'eri Niego, ACBD, has a recent publication
STILfeatured in this week's article.

Recent publications for Central Clinical School feature affiliated authors in the following departments:



  • Melbourne Sexual Health Centre
  • Peninsula Clinical School
  • ACBD
  • MAPrc
  • Gastroenterology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Neuroscience
  • Diabetes
  • NTRI
  • Anaesthesia and Perioperative Medicine
  • Surgery



Translational Research Symposium Speaker Spotlight:Professor Karin Jandeleit-Dahm

Prof. Karin Jandeleit-Dahm
Monash University's 5th annual Translational Research Symposium is being hosted by its three 21 June 2019. The symposium will host a diverse group of medical researchers presenting their work into translational research. RSVP here.
metropolitan clinical schools on

Professor Karin Jandeleit-Dahm is a group leader in the Department of Diabetes at Central Clinical School.

17 Apr 2019

No CCS News over Easter break

Due to the extended Easter / ANZAC Day break, the next CCS News will go out on Friday 10th May. Enjoy the break everyone!

Promising technology heads to Melbourne for Parkinson's Disease trial

The Reviver in action

Technology being brought to Melbourne as part of a trial by Neuroscience researcher Dr Ben Sinclair made the Sydney news recently. The Reviver is a device that tilts people and rotates them through the gravitational field, strengthening muscles with minimal conscious effort. In people with neuromuscular degenerative conditions like Multiple Sclerosis and Parkinson's Disease, it stimulates remaining reflex pathways, providing better muscle tone and balance.

Inaugural Monash-wide immunology symposium

Dr Emily Edwards from our Department of Immunology and Pathology is on the organising committee of ImmuMon 2019, the first annual symposium to promote networking and collaboration among immunology researchers across Monash University. It will be held on 7th June 2019 at the former Alfred Research Alliance lecture theatre, 75 Commercial Road, Melbourne.

Translational Research Symposium Speaker Spotlight: Doctor Joshua Ooi

Dr Joshua Ooi
Monash University's 5th annual Translational Research Symposium is being hosted by its three metropolitan clinical schools on 21 June 2019. The symposium will host a diverse group of medical researchers presenting their work into translational research. RSVP here.

Doctor Joshua Ooi is a senior research fellow in the Centre of Inflammatory Diseases at Monash Health.

11 Apr 2019

CCS Recent Publications: 3rd - 9th April

Recent publications for Central Clinical School feature affiliated authors in the following departments:
Prof. Robyn O'Hehir AO had two articles published this week.



  • Neuroscience
  • MAPrc
  • Peninsula Clinical School
  • Anaesthesia and Perioperative Medicine
  • Melbourne Sexual Health Centre
  • Gastroenterology
  • Australian Centre for Blood Diseases
  • Diabetes
  • AIRmed









10 Apr 2019

Study finds drug link to harmful diabetic complication

Surgery and fasting were associated with a higher risk
of DKA in inpatients
by Anne Crawford

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious and potentially life-threatening medical condition.
It is associated with very high blood glucose levels and insufficient insulin in the blood, which forces the body to burn fat for energy and leads to a build-up of dangerous chemical substances called ketones in the blood.

DKA occurs mostly in people with type 1 diabetes; those with type 2 diabetes develop it very rarely and usually in the context of severe stress.

However, in the past few years clinicians treating people with type 2 diabetes across Melbourne have noticed that some were developing the condition after being administered oral antidiabetic drugs called sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2i).

A/Prof White inducted as NANOS Fellow

A/Prof Owen White, co-lead of the School's Ocular Motor Research group, has been inducted as a Fellow of the North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society (NANOS) in recognition of his substantial contribution to NeuroOpthalmology.

Fellows must be board certified in their specialty, have a chief interest and specialty training in Neuro-Ophthalmology, be an active member of NANOS, and demonstrate special achievement in clinical NeuroOphthalmology.

A couple of photos from some recent international meetings involving CCS staff


Prof Mark Cooper AO (left) and Prof Merlin Thomas (right) in
Lebanon as part of a meeting about the Australia-Arab Grant

Prof Wendy Brown, Prof Jayashri Kulkarni
and Prof Karin Jandeleit-Dahm at a meeting
with Newcastle University in Prato recently




New recommendations for HBV during cancer therapy

Dr Joseph Doyle
Dr Joseph Doyle from the Department of Infectious Diseases was involved in the creation of Australian recommendations for the management of hepatitis B (HBV) during cancer therapy, which were released recently by the Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases.

This Australian consensus statement simplifies the approach to testing and preventive strategies for HBV during cancer therapy for medical specialists in infectious diseases, hepatology, haematology, oncology and paediatrics.

Approximately 240,000 Australians are living with hepatitis B virus infection, and approximately 2.3 million Australians have been exposed or infected in the past. Individuals with current or hepatitis B are at risk of viral reactivation during cancer therapy. Reactivation can lead to liver failure, death or cancer treatment interruption that reduces cancer survival.

Translational Research Symposium Speaker Spotlight: Associate Professor Suzanne Miller

A/Prof Suzanne Miller
Monash University's 5th annual Translational Research Symposium is being hosted by its three metropolitan clinical schools on 21 June 2019. The symposium will host a diverse group of medical researchers presenting their work into translational research. RSVP here.

Associate Professor Suzanne Miller is the Deputy Director of the Ritchie Centre at the Hudson Institute.

4 Apr 2019

CCS Recent Publications: 27th March - 2nd April

Prof. Helmut Butzkueven, 
(pictured left with his group), 
has a recent publication on the role of 
Vitamin D in multiple sclerosis.
Recent publications for Central Clinical School feature affiliated authors in the following departments:

  • Neuroscience
  • MAPrc
  • Peninsula Clinical School
  • Anaesthesia and Perioperative Medicine
  • Melbourne Sexual Health Centre
  • Gastroenterology
  • Australian Centre for Blood Diseases
  • Diabetes
  • AIRmed


3 Apr 2019

Dr Vincent Cornelisse takes out Victorian Premier's Prize for Best Public Health Researcher

Dr Cornelisse accepting his award
Huge congratulations go to Melbourne Sexual Health Centre and Alfred Health researcher Dr Vincent Cornelisse.

Dr Cornelisse's research focussed on the prevention of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections.

Populations affected by HIV are the same populations affected by bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including chlamydia, gonorrhoea and syphilis. His research seeks to find and evaluate new strategies to prevent the transmission of HIV and STIs.

As part of this research, he's validated the use of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) eligibility criteria, which provided important information for the Australian PrEP clinical guidelines.

Could magnetic pulses help beat teen depression?

by Anne Crawford

A study showing that repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) reduced depression and anxiety in young people has pointed to factors suggesting who would be most likely to benefit from the treatment.

TMS, a non-invasive, well-tolerated procedure that uses magnetic pulses to stimulate nerve cells in the brain, is well-established as a treatment for depression in adults but little research has been conducted to test its use in young people.

CCS Recent Publications: 19th March - 26th March 2019

Recent publications for Central Clinical School feature affiliated authors in the following departments:
A/Prof Menno van Zelm has two articles
featured in this week's recent publications.

  • Pathology and Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • National Trauma Institute
  • AIRMed
  • Neuroscience
  • Australian Centre for Blood Diseases
  • Melbourne Sexual Health Centre




Translational Research Symposium Speaker Spotlight: Doctor Kirsten Palmer

Dr Kirsten Palmer
Monash University's 5th annual Translational Research Symposium is being hosted by its three metropolitan clinical schools on 21 June 2019. The symposium will host a diverse group of medical researchers presenting their work into translational research. RSVP here.

Doctor Kirsten Palmer is a research fellow in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Monash Health.

A bittersweet farewell to a popular staff member

Ashleigh Clarke with Head of School Professor Stephen Jane

The School said a reluctant goodbye last week to our Research Manager Ashleigh Clarke. Ash has been in the School since 2011, but she worked with our Head of School, Professor Stephen Jane, for many years prior to that at Royal Melbourne Hospital.

She's heading off to take on a similar role with Ballarat Health, a move that will significantly reduce her current four-hour plus daily commute.

Ash was farewelled with a lunch on March 28th.

Ash, Ballarat's gain is very much our loss.

27 Mar 2019

Seeking clarity on a fuzzy neurological condition

A/Professor Joanne Fielding and Professor Owen White from the Department of Neuroscience had a busy Friday morning last week, discussing their research into Visual Snow on both Neil Mitchell's 3AW radio show, and then featuring on Melbourne's Channel 9 News.

Visual Snow is thought to affect the way the brain processes optical messages from the eyes, with affected people viewing the world through a film of what looks like TV static. There are many related symptoms, including migraines, floaters, auras and more. It often takes years for people to be formally diagnosed, creating a tense and frustrating wait.

New treatment of acute myeloid leukemia achieves remarkable results in a disease formerly with little hope

A/Prof Andrew Wei

The prognosis for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is poor: very few achieve remission and for those that don’t the option is largely palliative. Every year almost 1,000 Australians die of the disease and clinical trials into new therapies for older patients have largely failed.

A new drug trial has achieved a remarkable result, clearing the bone marrow of leukaemia in almost 60% of patients. The trial was considered so effective that the US Food and Drug Administration approved its use last November for the treatment of AML.

Associate Professor Andrew Wei, from the Alfred Hospital and Central Clinical School's Australian Centre for Blood Diseases, commenced research in this area almost two decades ago. He is now the lead clinician/researcher on the international trial of the cancer drug, currently combined with cytarabine to treat older adults with AML.

Why I fight fires

Some of you will be familiar with Anne Crawford, who writes many of our blog posts. Anne is also a volunteer fire fighter with the Country Fire Association, and recently spent time fighting the serious fires in Bunyip, east of Melbourne. We invited her to share her experiences..

by Anne Crawford
Biomedical science writer


Photos like this reveal the intensity of fighting large fires,
but don't convey the hours of boredom and watchful waiting.
I joined the CFA because the farmer next door asked me. As simple as that. That was more than 10 years and two campaign fires ago, the 2009 fires and Bunyip.

Being a fire-fighter isn’t always about battling the blazes you see on television. Yes, there are times when you’re so pumped full of adrenalin that you work at a fire for hours on end without noticing the 40 deg. plus heat but they’re the minority.

Womens Minds Matter




Prof. Jayashri Kulkarni featured in the "Women" project.
Credit: Sam Burke & Rebecca Umlauf
Prof. Jayashri Kulkarni has been honoured with a 4-metre high banner currently displayed outside the Malvern Town Hall. Artists Sam Burke and Rebecca Umlauf captured eight influential and inspiring women as part of the Stonnington Council’s “Women” project. The black and white portraits celebrate women’s achievements as opposed to the objectified images we usually see in billboards. Professor Kulkarni, Director of the MAPrc (Monash Alfred Psychiatry research centre), is pictured wearing a white t-shirt with the slogan “Women’s Minds Matter”, a fitting message for her extraordinary contribution to the mental health field. “I felt really chuffed to be in the company of famous business women, champion women's footballer, feminist activist, and other fabulous women”. Western Bulldog's ex-Vice President Susan Alberti, Boowurrung elder Carolyn Briggs and tram driver Lee Brown also feature in the month long installation.


Translational Research Symposium Speaker Spotlight: Professor Christoph Hagemeyer

A/prof Christoph Hagemeyer
Monash University's 5th annual Translational Research Symposium is being hosted by its three metropolitan clinical schools on 21 June 2019. The symposium will host a diverse group of medical researchers presenting their work into translational research. RSVP here.

Associate Professor Christoph Hagemeyer is Head of the Nanobiotechnology Laboratory at the Australian Centre for Blood Diseases.

21 Mar 2019

CCS Recent Publications: 12th March - 18th March 2019

ACBD researchers published on
treatments for chronic ulcers
Recent publications for Central Clinical School feature affiliated authors in the following departments:


  • Surgery
  • Australian Centre for Blood Diseases
  • Neuroscience
  • Melbourne Sexual Health Centre
  • Anaesthesia and Perioperative Medicine
  • Infectious Diseases

Study investigates MS medication use in pregnant women


Women with active MS are increasingly opting to try to get
pregnant, rather than waiting for remission
by Loretta Piccenna 

The number of people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) has steadily increased over the past 50 years with women three times more likely to develop MS than men, resulting in a greater number of women of childbearing age presenting to neurologists in specialist clinics.

However, very limited information is available about the safety and use of disease-modifying treatments (DMTs) in these women during pregnancy. No clinical guidelines currently exist to assist health professionals in providing informed advice to women about their treatment.

Public Surgery Lecture and Brain Awareness Week wrap up


From left Dr. Mostafiz Rahman,
A/Prof Heather Cleland, Mr. Cheng Lo,
Prof Steven Boyce, Dr Shiva Akbarzadeh
and Dr. Ilia Banakh

Mid-March was a time of great community outreach for the School, as we hosted events to share our work and the latest knowledge with colleagues and the public.

The Department of Surgery's Annual Public Lecture was delivered by Emeritus Professor Stephen Boyce from the University of Cincinnati. He spoke about the importance of wound closure in treating life-threatening burn injuries, and delved into the latest research surrounding investigative models of tissue-engineered skin to improve closure. The technology offers the hope of one day restoring the use of full, uninjured anatomy and physiology of skin, without scarring. Around 80 people turned out to hear from the visiting Professor.

Speakers: A/Prof Joanne Fielding,
Dr Caroline Gurvich
MC: Professor Jayashri Kulkarni
The Department of NeuroscienceMAPrc and Alfred Health jointly celebrated Brain Awareness Week through a public lecture, and information stands in The Alfred engaging the public in the opportunities to participate in brain-related research here at the precinct. Students Flavia Medeiros Gomes and Juliana de Castro e Silva proved that playdoh is not just for adults by making incredible models of neurons and brain anatomy, which passers-by loved.

Playdoh neuron
The lecture saw A/Prof Joanne Fielding and Dr Caroline Gurvich share the latest on research into Visual Snow, and sex hormones and mental health, respectively. You can see Joanne's lecture here and Caroline's lecture here.






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